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Posts Tagged ‘IPv6’

More Number Scarcity

Last year ICANN allocated the last five IPv4 blocks to the Regional Internet Registries (RIRs). Since then we have seen a concerted effort on the part of network and content providers to make sure they support IPv6, so they’ll be ready for the next few billion Internet users. But there’s another Internet number resource which […]


April 2nd, 2012 by | Posted in ICANN | Tags: , , , |

2012 North American IPv6 Summit

This year’s summit is the North American (rather than Rocky Mountain) IPv6 Summit and it will again be the largest IPv6 event in North America, even bigger than last year. There’s a long line up of fantastic speakers and over 500 IPv6 networking professionals expected to be in attendance. Plus, I’m presenting something on all three days!

2012 North American IPv6 Summit is a post from don't panic – One Network Architect's View of Life, the Internet, and Everything.


Measuring Worldwide Growth in IPv6 Deployments

This is a guest post by Mirjam Kühne, Labs Community Builder at the RIPE NCC. RIPE Labs is a platform designed by the RIPE NCC for network operators, industry experts and the RIPE NCC to expose, test and discuss innovative Internet-related tools, ideas and analysis. In early 2011, the RIPE NCC shared some graphs that […]


March 7th, 2012 by | Posted in ICANN | Tags: , , , |

Introducing IPv6 | Neighbor Discovery & SLAAC

In this final installment of the don’t panic series “Introducing IPv6,” you will learn about Neighbor Discovery and Stateless Address AutoConfiguration.

Introducing IPv6 | Neighbor Discovery & SLAAC is a post from don't panic – One Network Architect's View of Life, the Internet, and Everything.


Introducing IPv6 | IPv6 Headers

The beauty of the IPv6 header is that it has been streamlined and contains only those pieces of information that are necessary on every IPv6 packet. All optional IP information is encoded in extension headers, which are added to packets between the standard IPv6 header and the upper-layer header.

Introducing IPv6 | IPv6 Headers is a post from don't panic – One Network Architect's View of Life, the Internet, and Everything.


IPv6 Transit and Peering

We (the Global Network Engineering Community(GNEC)) have made many mistakes with IPv4 Peering and Transit configurations and operational practices. As operators begin turning up more and more IPv6 E-BGP sessions with peers and transit providers, there is an opportunity to do things right from the beginning.

IPv6 Transit and Peering is a post from don't panic – One Network Architect's View of Life, the Internet, and Everything.


Introducing IPv6 | Classifying IPv6 Addresses

As with IPv4, an IPv6 address serves as an identifier for an interface or group of interfaces. Also like IPv4, IPv6 addresses come in several types, based on how they represent those interfaces. IPv6 has three types of addresses. This post covers all three, plus some special purpose addresses as well.

Introducing IPv6 | Classifying IPv6 Addresses is a post from don't panic – One Network Architect's View of Life, the Internet, and Everything.


Introducing IPv6 | Understanding IPv6 Addresses

The primary difference between IPv4 and IPv6 addresses is length. IPv4 addresses are 32 bits long and IPv6 addresses are 128 bits long. This means that an IPv4 address is made up of 32 1s and 0s while an IPv6 address is made up of 128 of them – 128 binary digits. This massive length forces IPv6 addresses to be written using a different notation than IPv4 addresses and thus makes them very easy to distinguish from IPv4 addresses.

Introducing IPv6 | Understanding IPv6 Addresses is a post from don't panic – One Network Architect's View of Life, the Internet, and Everything.


The North American 2012 IPv6 Summit supported by the Colorado ISOC

The Colorado ISOC is sponsoring the North American 2012 IPv6 Summit. The conference will be held April 9-11, 2012 at the Grand Hyatt Denver Colorado. IPv6 networking professionals from all over the world will be attending. This will be the largest IPv6 conference in North America in 2012.


As a member of the ARIN Advisory Council (AC), I have to stay up to date on all of the goings on in the world of ARIN policy development (that’s kind of the point of the AC). These policy changes affect many people but are fairly hard to keep track of for most (most engineers […]

ARIN Update – 10-JAN-2012 is a post from don't panic – One Network Architect's View of Life, the Internet, and Everything.